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Three Students Win College Scholarships

February 13 2013

 

Three Students Win College Scholarships for Their ACT High School Poster Contest Entries

IOWA CITY, Iowa—ACT has announced the winners of its annual high school poster contest for 2013. The winning students, whose posters were selected from nearly 700 entries submitted from 48 different states, are:

Emily Ballentine, a senior at Springfield Clark Career Technology Center in Springfield, Ohio, is this year’s first-place winner. Ballentine will receive a $5,000 scholarship to the college of her choice. Her winning poster, “Colleges Are Looking for You,” is designed to encourage high school students to take the ACT® Test as a way to make it easier for colleges to find students. She credits her computer graphic arts teacher, Linda Cabaluna, for encouraging her. Ballentine hopes to enroll in a graphic design program after graduation, possibly at Columbus College of Art & Design.

Second-place finisher Preston Sitorus of Bradshaw Christian High School in Sacramento, Calif., will receive a $2,500 scholarship for his entry, “Find Out What You’re Made Of.” Currently a high school senior and co-president of the BCHS Student Council, Sitorus plans to major in biology at a California university. Sitorus said he was surprised to receive the award, given the hundreds of entries from fantastic artists nationwide. He noted that he wanted to use “a simple but striking design” that would entice students to find out more about “the wonderful opportunities” that await those who take the ACT Test.

Deborah Yu will receive a $1,000 scholarship for her third-place entry, “The Future Starts Here.” Yu is a senior at Marquette High School in Chesterfield, Mo. She plans to study computer science at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Yu said she wanted her poster artwork to convey that college is a deciding factor in students’ futures. “The ACT is really the gateway to future success,” she said.

The purpose of the ACT high school poster is to encourage students to plan and prepare for college and the ACT Test. Winners were selected based on the poster’s creativity, visual appeal, and overall impact. Ballentine’s winning design will be printed and mailed to 30,000 high schools nationwide. To view the winning entries, visit http://www.actstudent.org/postercontest/.